Grönefeld Parallax 1912

Parallax 1912 : Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

Parallax Tourbillon

Brand: Grönefeld
Family: Parallax Tourbillon
Reference: Parallax 1912
Name: Parallax Tourbillon
Produced: 2014
Limited: Yes, 12 units

Case

Material: Stainless steel
Glass: Sapphire
Back: Open
Shape: Round
Diameter: 43.00 mm
Height: 12.50 mm
W/R: 30.00 m

Dial

Color: Silver
Material: Silver
Indexes: Stick / Dot
Hands: Alpha

Movement

Bart and Tim Grönefeld use stainless steel bridges exclusively for their movements. As well as the superior hardness and durability of stainless steel compared to the more generally used steel and brass, the metal gleams when polished to a mirror finish. Achieving superlative finishes in stainless steel is no easy task: polishing the hard metal takes a master watchmaker up to four times longer than polishing more commonly used brass.

As with the immaculately finished movement bridges, the tourbillon cage is crafted in stainless steel. Three days are required just for the hand finishing of the tourbillon components. A highly-polished stainless steel sleeve around the tourbillon draws further attention to the beautiful escapement by reflecting the oscillating balance wheel and the rotations of the escape wheel and tourbillon cage.

Normally a central seconds hand requires a friction spring to prevent small fluttering caused by play in the gear train. But for the Parallax Tourbillon, the Grönefeld brothers developed the movement with an added pinion and wheel so that the energy-sapping friction spring is not required. The latter feature improves power transfer to the regulator, contributing to the impressive power-72-hour power reserve.

Type:Handwound
Brand:Grönefeld
Caliber:G-03
Display:Analog
Jewels:27
Reserve:72 h
Frequency:21600 bph
Time:Hours, Minutes, Seconds
Additionals:Power Reserve Indicator, Tourbillon Escapement, Crown Position Indicator

Description

The Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon features a "flying" tourbillon with a large central seconds hand, stop seconds, a power reserve- and winding-setting mechanism indicator. The in-house movement displays sophistication and craftsmanship at the very highest level.

Well-designed and impeccably executed tourbillons are particularly accurate timepieces. The tourbillon is a circular cage encompassing the oscillating balance wheel, the beating heart of the movement. The cage rotates once a minute around its axis, minimizing the negative influence of gravity, and consequently improving the timekeeping of the watch.

Invented in 1795 by Abraham Louis Breguet to compensate the effects of gravity on the balance, the tourbillon still continues to be counted as one of the most ingenious complications in watchmaking. In 1920 Alfred Helwig further developed the tourbillon, removing the necessity for an upper support bridge to create a "flying" tourbillon. The absence of the upper bridge enables uninterrupted views to the fascinating mechanism.

The flying tourbillon allows full appreciation of the concentric, rhythmic "breathing" of the balance hairspring, while ensuring high precision. Bart and Tim Grönefeld further highlighted the tourbillon by raising it out of the movement and above the dial. As with the immaculately finished movement bridges, the tourbillon cage is crafted in stainless steel. Three days are required just for the hand finishing of the tourbillon components.

The present version has a stainless steel case and a silver dial.